What does excessive cat grooming look like?

  • Date: August 13, 2021
  • Time to read: 4 min.

Excessive cat grooming may not be something that many people are familiar with, but it is an important issue to be aware of. Excessive cat grooming can be a sign of stress, anxiety, or underlying medical issues in cats. It can also be a sign of behavioral problems, such as boredom or frustration. In this article, we will discuss what excessive cat grooming looks like and how to address it.

Signs of Excessive Cat Grooming

Cats naturally groom themselves and it is a healthy behavior. They spend hours a day licking their fur and keeping it in good condition. However, sometimes cats can over-groom, which can result in serious health problems. Knowing what excessive cat grooming looks like can help you identify if your pet is engaging in this behavior and seek help from a veterinarian.

Bald Patches

A common sign of excessive cat grooming is bald patches appearing on the cat’s fur. This is usually a result of the cat licking and biting at its fur until it is gone. Cats that are over-grooming may also chew on other areas of their body such as the tail, legs, and ears. This can lead to open wounds and infection.

Visible Skin

Excessive cat grooming can also lead to visible skin. When a cat licks and bites their fur too much, the fur can become thin and patchy. This can lead to the cat’s skin becoming visible and easier to see. This is especially true in cats that have light colored fur. If you notice your cat’s skin becoming more visible, it could be a sign of excessive grooming.

Itching and Scratching

Itching and scratching is another common sign of excessive cat grooming. Cats that are over-grooming may scratch their fur excessively and even their skin. This can lead to open wounds, irritation, and infection. If you notice your cat scratching excessively, it may be a sign of excessive grooming.

Change in Activity Level

Excessive cat grooming can also lead to a change in activity level. Cats that are over-grooming may become lethargic and not have the same energy level as before. This can be a sign that the cat is in pain or uncomfortable due to the excessive grooming. If you notice your cat’s activity level has changed, it could be a sign of excessive grooming.

Changes in Eating Habits

Excessive cat grooming can also lead to changes in eating habits. If your cat is over-grooming, they may not want to eat as much as they normally do. This could be a sign that the cat is in pain or uncomfortable due to the excessive grooming. It is important to take your cat to the vet if you notice any changes in their eating habits as it could be a sign of a larger underlying health issue.

Changes in Behavior

Excessive cat grooming can also lead to changes in behavior. Cats that are over-grooming may become more aggressive or anxious. They may also seem more withdrawn and not want to interact with people or other animals. If you notice any changes in your cat’s behavior, it could be a sign of excessive grooming and should be addressed by a veterinarian.

Identifying the signs of excessive cat grooming is important in keeping your cat healthy and happy. If you notice any of the signs mentioned above, it is important to take your cat to the vet for a diagnosis and treatment.

## Common Myths About Excessive Cat Grooming
1. Myth: Excessive cat grooming is caused by stress.
Fact: Stress may cause cats to groom themselves more, but excessive grooming can be caused by allergies, skin conditions, parasites, or certain types of illnesses.

2. Myth: Excessive cat grooming is normal behavior.
Fact: Excessive grooming can be a sign of an underlying medical condition or stress, and should be addressed by a veterinarian.

3. Myth: Cats only groom themselves when they need it.
Fact: Cats may groom themselves for comfort, or to relieve boredom or stress. In some cases, cats may groom excessively due to anxiety or compulsive behavior.

4. Myth: Cats only groom themselves in certain areas.
Fact: Cats may groom themselves all over their body, including their head, neck, chest, back, and legs. Excessive grooming may lead to bald patches or skin irritation.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does excessive cat grooming look like?

Excessive cat grooming often looks like bald patches of fur with scabs or irritated skin. Cats may also excessively lick or chew certain areas of their bodies, causing more damage to the skin.

How can excessive cat grooming be prevented?

Excessive cat grooming can be prevented by addressing any underlying medical issues such as allergies, fleas, or skin disorders. Additionally, providing cats with mental stimulation and a stress-free environment can help reduce their grooming behavior.

Conclusion

: Cats naturally groom themselves, but excessive grooming can lead to visible skin, bald patches, itching and scratching, changes in activity levels, eating habits and behavior. If you notice any of these signs, take your cat to the vet for diagnosis and treatment.

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