What is Splooting cats?

  • Date: May 14, 2021
  • Time to read: 5 min.

Splooting cats is a term used to describe a behavior in cats where they extend their hind legs behind them and sit on their hindquarters with their front legs extended in front of them. It is a display of contentment and can be seen when cats are feeling relaxed and comfortable. Splooting cats are often seen in photos and videos online, and it’s a common behavior among cats of all shapes and sizes.

What is Splooting?

Splooting is a funny-looking posture cats adopt when they are sitting down, but with their back legs extended out behind them so that the hindquarters is in the air, resembling a human sploot. While the posture may look uncomfortable, cats actually seem to enjoy it and can even be seen doing it in the wild.

The term “splooting” was first coined in 2013 by cat owners who noticed their cats doing the funny pose and wanted to give it a name. Since then, the term has become widespread among cat owners and veterinarians alike, and is used to describe the posture.

Why do cats sploot?

The exact reason why cats do the splooting posture is still unknown, but there are several theories as to why they do it. Some believe that cats do it to stretch out their backs and legs, while others think it gives them a sense of comfort and security.

One theory suggests that cats may sploot as a way to cool off. Cats don’t have sweat glands, so they are unable to cool down through sweat like humans do. By getting their hindquarters off the ground and exposing their bellies to the air, cats may be able to cool down more effectively.

Another theory suggests that cats may sploot as a way to show their owners that they are relaxed and comfortable. By splooting, cats may be trying to convey to their owners that they feel safe and content.

What are the benefits of splooting?

Splooting may have several benefits for cats. As mentioned earlier, it may be a way for cats to cool off, which is especially important for cats who live in warm climates.

Splooting may also help cats to relax and feel secure. By splooting, cats may be able to stretch out their legs and back, which can help to relieve tension and stress.

Finally, splooting may be beneficial for cats who suffer from joint issues or arthritis. By splooting, cats may be able to reduce pressure on their joints and increase blood flow, which can help to reduce inflammation and pain.

Are there any risks associated with splooting?

Although splooting may have some benefits, there are also some risks associated with the posture. For example, cats who sploot may be more prone to sore muscles or ligaments due to the strain that the posture puts on the body.

In addition, cats who sploot may be more prone to skin irritation or infection due to the increased exposure to the ground. If your cat is splooting on a surface that is not clean, there is a chance that your cat could get an infection or develop a skin irritation.

Finally, cats who sploot may be at risk of overstretching their muscles or ligaments, which can lead to injury. If you notice your cat splooting excessively, it’s important to talk to your veterinarian to make sure that your cat is not at risk for injury.

How can I help my cat sploot safely?

If you’d like to help your cat sploot safely, there are a few things you can do.

First, make sure your cat has a comfortable and safe surface to sploot on. If your cat is splooting on a hard floor, make sure to provide a soft blanket or cushion for them to sploot on.

Second, make sure your cat is not splooting too often or for too long. If you notice your cat splooting excessively, it may be a sign that they are stressed or in pain, and it’s important to talk to your veterinarian about any concerns you may have.

Finally, make sure to check your cat’s skin for any irritation or infection. If your cat is splooting on a surface that is not clean, it’s important to inspect their skin for any signs of injury or infection.

### Common Myths About Splooting Cats

Splooting cats have become increasingly popular in recent years, with many people asking the question: what is splooting? Unfortunately, there are a lot of misconceptions surrounding splooting cats, so it’s important to understand what it really is and why cats do it.

Myth 1: Splooting is a sign that a cat is in pain.

This is not true. Splooting is a normal behavior for cats, and it does not always indicate that a cat is in pain. In fact, cats will often sploot when they are feeling relaxed and content.

Myth 2: Splooting cats are lazy.

This is also false. Splooting cats are actually quite active and playful, and they may do it as a way to cool off or find a comfortable position.

Myth 3: Splooting is a sign of dominance in cats.

This is not true. Splooting is a normal behavior for cats and it has nothing to do with dominance. Cats may sploot to show contentment or to get comfortable.

Myth 4: Splooting cats cannot jump.

This is also false. Splooting cats can jump just like any other cat, and they may even do it while they are splooting.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Splooting?

Splooting is a behavior in which cats sit with their hind legs stretched out and their front legs tucked close to their chest. This position is often accompanied by a relaxed posture and a blissful expression on the cat’s face.

Why do cats Sploot?

Splooting is generally considered a sign of contentment and comfort. Cats may sploot to show that they are content and relaxed in their environment. It may also be an unconscious behavior that cats do to stretch out their legs and relax their muscles.

Conclusion

Splooting is a funny-looking posture cats adopt when they are sitting down, with their back legs extended out behind them. The term was first coined in 2013, but the exact reasons why cats do it are still unknown. Benefits may include helping cats cool off, relax, and relieve joint pain. When allowing your cat to sploot, make sure they have a comfortable surface, are not doing it too often, and their skin is checked for any irritation or infection.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Do cats know their names?

Previous Post

Should you bath an indoor cat?

Next Post

Oprah Sets New Marathon Record with Impressive Time

Oprah's Marathon Performance: A Closer Look