Should I clean the black stuff out of my cats ears?

  • Date: November 14, 2022
  • Time to read: 5 min.

If you have a cat, you may have noticed a black, waxy substance accumulating in their ears. You may be wondering if this should be cleaned or left alone. It is important to be aware of the potential causes of the black ear wax in cats, and to know when and how to clean it safely. This article will provide information on the causes, signs, and treatments for this condition in cats, as well as ways to prevent it from happening in the future.

Overview

It’s not unusual for cats to have a buildup of “black stuff” in their ears. This buildup, called ear mites, is a common problem in cats, especially those that are not regularly groomed. While cleaning your cat’s ears may seem like a daunting task, it’s actually quite straightforward and should be done regularly. In this article, we’ll discuss the signs and symptoms of ear mites in cats, how to safely clean your cat’s ears, and when to call your veterinarian for further help.

Signs and Symptoms of Ear Mites in Cats

Ear mites are small, spider-like parasites that feed on the wax and oils in your cat’s ear canal. The most common signs of ear mites in cats include:

  • Excessive scratching of the ears or head
  • Dark, crumbly wax or black debris in the ear canal
  • An unpleasant odor coming from the ears
  • Redness or irritation in the ears
  • Head shaking or tilting

If you notice any of these signs in your cat, it’s important to take action as soon as possible. Ear mites left untreated can lead to a painful infection and even hearing loss.

How to Clean Your Cat’s Ears

Cleaning your cat’s ears is a simple process, but it’s important to do it correctly to avoid damaging your cat’s delicate ear canal. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to safely clean your cat’s ears:

Step 1: Gather Your Supplies

You’ll need the following items to clean your cat’s ears:

  • A cotton ball or gauze pad
  • A veterinary-approved ear cleaner
  • A towel or cloth

Step 2: Prepare the Area

Before you start cleaning your cat’s ears, make sure you have a comfortable area for them to sit. Place a towel or cloth on the floor and have your cat sit on it. If your cat is resistant to staying still, you may need to have someone help you hold them in place.

Step 3: Apply the Ear Cleaner

Once your cat is comfortable, use a cotton ball or gauze pad to apply the ear cleaner to the inside of your cat’s ear canal. Be gentle and do not push the cleaner too far into the ear.

Step 4: Massage the Ear

Once the ear cleaner is in place, massage your cat’s ear gently for a few seconds. This will help loosen any debris or wax that is stuck in the ear.

Step 5: Wipe Away the Debris

After massaging the ear, use a cotton ball or gauze pad to wipe away any debris or wax that has been loosened. Do not use too much pressure as this can damage your cat’s ear.

Step 6: Repeat As Needed

Once you’ve finished cleaning your cat’s ear, repeat the process as needed. It’s important to clean your cat’s ears regularly to prevent the buildup of ear mites.

When to Call Your Veterinarian

If your cat’s ears are still dirty after cleaning, or if they seem to be in pain or have an infection, it’s important to contact your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can prescribe medication to help clear up the ear mites, as well as any other issues that may be present.

In conclusion, while cleaning your cat’s ears can seem intimidating, it’s actually a fairly straightforward process. It’s important to clean your cat’s ears regularly to prevent the buildup of ear mites. If your cat’s ears are still dirty after cleaning or if they seem to be in pain or have an infection, it’s important to contact your veterinarian for further help.

### Common Myths About Cleaning a Cat’s Ears

Myth: Cleaning a cat’s ears is an unnecessary task.

Fact: Regularly cleaning a cat’s ears is an important part of their overall health and hygiene. If a cat’s ears become dirty or infected, it can cause discomfort and even hearing loss. Cleaning a cat’s ears should be done regularly to ensure they remain healthy and free of dirt and debris.

Myth: A cotton swab is the best way to clean a cat’s ears.

Fact: Using a cotton swab is not recommended for cleaning a cat’s ears. Cotton swabs can push dirt and debris further into the ear canal and can even cause injury to the ear. Instead, use a clean cloth or a soft-bristled brush to gently clean the outer part of the ear.

Myth: I can use human ear cleaner on my cat’s ears.

Fact: Human ear cleaners are not formulated for use on cats and can be too harsh for their sensitive ears. It is best to use a pet-specific ear cleaner that is designed for cats.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I clean the black stuff out of my cats ears?

Yes, it is important to regularly clean your cat’s ears to keep them healthy. Cats are prone to ear infections, and the black stuff you see is likely wax buildup. You can purchase a pet-safe ear cleaner from your veterinarian or pet store and follow the instructions on the package. Be sure to be gentle while cleaning your cat’s ears and never use cotton swabs.

How often should I clean my cats ears?

It is recommended to clean your cat’s ears once every 2-4 weeks. If you notice a lot of wax buildup or if your cat’s ears seem to be itchy or uncomfortable, you may need to clean them more frequently. Be sure to speak to your veterinarian to determine the best cleaning schedule for your cat.

Conclusion

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Ear mites are a common problem in cats, especially those that are not regularly groomed. Signs and symptoms of ear mites include excessive scratching, dark wax or black debris in the ears, an unpleasant odor, redness or irritation, and head shaking or tilting. When cleaning your cat’s ears, you should use a cotton ball or gauze pad, a veterinary-approved ear cleaner, and a towel or cloth. Massage the ear gently and wipe away debris. If your cat’s ears are still dirty after cleaning or they seem to be in pain or have an infection, it’s important to contact your veterinarian for further help.

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