Is feline Hyperesthesia common?

  • Date: August 3, 2022
  • Time to read: 4 min.

Feline hyperesthesia, also known as “rolling skin syndrome,” is a condition that affects cats and can cause them to display neurological and behavioral symptoms, such as excessive grooming and scratching, aggression, and vocalization. It is not a common condition, but it is one that is increasingly being recognized by veterinarians and cat owners alike. This article will discuss the symptoms and causes of feline hyperesthesia, as well as the available treatments.

What Is Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome?

Feline hyperesthesia syndrome, also known as atypical neurodermatitis or rolling skin syndrome, is an uncommon disorder that affects cats. It is characterized by bouts of intense itching, biting, licking, and rolling of the skin. Other signs include excessive grooming, agitation, and aggression.

Feline hyperesthesia syndrome is thought to be caused by an underlying neurological condition that affects the cat’s ability to process sensory information. While the exact cause is not known, it is believed to be a result of a combination of factors including stress, genetic predisposition, and environmental triggers.

How Common Is Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome?

Feline hyperesthesia syndrome is relatively rare and is thought to affect less than 1 percent of the feline population. It can occur in cats of any age, sex, or breed, although it appears to affect cats between the ages of three and seven more frequently.

The disorder is more commonly seen in cats that have been declawed or that have suffered from a previous traumatic experience. It is also more likely to occur in cats that are kept indoors and have limited opportunities for physical and mental stimulation.

Signs and Symptoms of Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome

The primary sign of feline hyperesthesia syndrome is intense itching, biting, licking, and rolling of the skin. This can be accompanied by excessive grooming, agitation, and aggression. Other signs may include dilated pupils, drooling, vocalization, and even seizures in severe cases.

The affected area of the skin may appear bald and inflamed, and the cat may even cause self-inflicted wounds in an attempt to scratch the itch. In some cases, the cat may even have compulsive behaviors such as tail chasing or running in circles.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome

A diagnosis of feline hyperesthesia syndrome is made based on the cat’s clinical signs and a physical examination. The vet may also recommend additional diagnostic tests such as blood work, urinalysis, and imaging to rule out other possible causes.

Treatment for feline hyperesthesia syndrome is typically aimed at reducing stress and providing relief from the itching and discomfort. This may include anti-anxiety medications, anti-inflammatory medications, and supplements. In some cases, environmental changes such as providing more mental and physical stimulation may be recommended.

It is important to note that feline hyperesthesia syndrome is a chronic condition and there is no cure. Treatment is aimed at providing relief from the symptoms and preventing them from worsening.

# Common Myths About Feline Hyperesthesia

Feline hyperesthesia is a complex neurological disorder that affects cats of all ages, breeds, and genders. Unfortunately, there are several myths about this condition that make it difficult for pet owners to understand. This article will debunk some of the common myths about feline hyperesthesia.

Myth 1: Feline Hyperesthesia is Rare

Feline hyperesthesia is actually quite common, affecting around 15-20% of cats. It can happen to cats of any age, breed, or gender, so it’s important to be aware of the signs and symptoms.

Myth 2: Feline Hyperesthesia is Contagious

Feline hyperesthesia is not contagious and it cannot be spread from one cat to another. It is caused by an underlying neurological issue and is not contagious.

Myth 3: Feline Hyperesthesia Can be Cured with Medication

Unfortunately, there is no single medication that can cure feline hyperesthesia. The condition is best managed with a combination of medication, environmental enrichment, and behavioral modification.

Myth 4: Feline Hyperesthesia is Painful

The signs and symptoms of feline hyperesthesia may appear painful, but the condition is not actually painful for cats. It is caused by an underlying neurological issue and cats may experience discomfort, but not actual pain.

Myth 5: Feline Hyperesthesia is Caused by Stress

While stress can exacerbate the symptoms of feline hyperesthesia, it is not the main cause of the condition. The underlying cause is an unknown neurological issue and stress is only a contributing factor.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is feline Hyperesthesia common?

No, feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition, although it can be seen in cats of any age, breed, or gender.

What are the symptoms of Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome?

The primary symptom of Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome is twitchy skin along the spine and tail, and can be accompanied by vocalization, agitation, or aggression. Other symptoms may include excessive grooming and skin lesions.

Conclusion

Feline hyperesthesia syndrome is an uncommon disorder that affects cats and is characterized by bouts of intense itching, biting, licking, and rolling of the skin. The exact cause is not known, but it is believed to be a combination of factors including stress, genetic predisposition, and environmental triggers. Signs include excessive grooming, agitation, and aggression, as well as dilated pupils, drooling, vocalization, and seizures in severe cases. Treatment is aimed at reducing stress and providing relief from the itching and discomfort, and may include anti-anxiety medications, anti-inflammatory medications, and supplements. Environmental changes such as providing more mental and physical stimulation may also be recommended.

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